(Admitedly, we don’t know Jacob’s cabin IS Jacob’s cabin – probably held MIB … but … )

Jacob’s Cabin and Horace’s Cabin is the same. Horace sounds like the Egyptian god
Horus, and his wife/mother is Isis – the goddess of fertility and the son/brother of Osiris – the Lord of the Dead/Resurrection. He was supposed to protect the people of Egypt from Set. The Pharaohs are said to be he in human form.

Another Horus link to babies is w/Tawaret – the goddess who protects pregnant women/childbirth. She was sleepin’ with Horus’ enemy, Set – the god of the chaos/darkness/desert (he’s delicious). Set lost a testicle, and that’s why the desert (and island?) are infertile. [Yeah, more info than we needed to know, but that’s what it says. There’s more to this story that could explain why MIB won’t eat food from Jacob *blecch* http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Horus ]

Set/Horus also fight to see who should be the ruler of Egypt (others?). There’s also stuff about ‘the Eye of Horus’.

So … How about Jacob is Horus and MIB is Set … and where do you go when you get off the island by spinning that wheel …

Problem – Horus has a falcon head – but then Tawaret’s is usually a hippos.

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We don’t have in in a lie, do we? (If anything, he seems burdened by having to be the messenger as asked.) I think he thinks he saw this. There is the flash that brings them to 2007 and the incident where all the Dharma at the Swan died (but not the 815ers who flashed – and Juliette’s either lucky that Jack’s there or buried somewhere like the rope without the well.)

BTW: Angels are Messengers …

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So, heaps of people have come up with really great theories – a lot to do with time loops, but none of them are really sitting that well with me, just because I can’t see how 1) all the time periods shown can be connected and 2) how they could possibly wrap it all together in just 1 more season.

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First off this is an unfinished theory.

What I am proposing is something different than the norm. This has to deal with a battle of good vs evil.

To determine whos good and evil thats an easy one. Jacob is good and MIB is evil. We all know that MIB wants to kill Jacob which makes him stick out as evil.

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*****WARNING: ONLY READ THIS IF U HAVE SEEN THE NEW STAR TREK MOVIE. POSSIBLE SPOILERS*****

in the new star trek movie, the romulins go back in time. they then try to stop the destruction of romulis. if they had succeded, then in the future they would have no need to go back in time. causing romulis to die. causing them to go back………. it would create a paradox. could this apply to lost?

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i think Jacob is Aaron or Aaron is the perfect human Jacob is looking for. and that man in black at the beging of the season finally, is jealous that Aaron is the perfect human and not him. so this man wants to kill Jacob & Aaron.

Thoughts?;)

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Okay… I used to be a strong supporter of “Whatever Happened, Happened” and thought all this talk about changing the past was hogwash, but I thought it interesting that in Star Trek, the new movie with some prominent Lost writers involved,

Edit by Admin: Spoiler for Star Trek movie:
[spoiler]
came up with a time travel story where the past WAS changed, creating an alternate universe… any thoughts on that?
[/spoiler]

Also, I have a theory about Locke and whether he really is Smokey as so many believe… what if the Locke we saw this season is actually from the future.

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I posted this article on my blog last week, but the site is very new and not really LOST-centric so I decided to post it here also. Please comment and let me know your thoughts.


“They’re coming.”

That was the last line of special significance spoken by a character on LOST prior to Juliet’s screeching whimper as she pounded away at a stubborn nuclear reactor that Mr. Fix-It, Sayid, promised would detonate on impact. Apparently, all it took was some good old-fashioned elbow grease to make the thing act right, despite a compelling fall from grace. It’s a good thing she let go of Sawyer’s hand, and I guess those frustrated with the quadrilateral love connection can at least take comfort knowing it was a necessary plot twist that would pave a path towards their expulsion from 1977. I’ll certainly miss our cultish, psychedelic Dharma ladies and gents, but it’s time to move the story forward. Cue the fade to … white?

That’s right, Carlton Cuse and Damon Lindelof can’t take credit for pioneering the technique, but let’s at least pay homage to their use of a mere transition to advance the series into its final season, at the same time reminding us not to forget other television success stories that made excellent use of the effect, including the Sopranos and Six Feet Under. So, what does it all mean? We know for a fact that the creators of LOST have been dangling the black and white theme in front of our faces since John Locke first introduced Walt to the game of backgammon.

There was the discovery of Adam and Eve, when Jack found black and white stones among the possessions of two decomposed skeletons in the caves. Claire once had a dream about Aaron on the beach, with Lock staring up at her sporting black and white eyes and breaking bad news that the survivors would pay the price for her shucking responsibility and giving up the baby. Now, enter Mr. Black, literally. In the opening scene of “The Incident,” we meet Jacob face to face for the first time, and he has a friend. By design, both characters contrast perfectly, with Jacob decked out in a white linen shirt, and Mr. Black wearing, well, black.

Now, we have to assume these two are at odds with each other after Mr. Black tells Jacob that he wants to kill him, implying there is no simple solution to fulfilling this desire. That revelation doesn’t appear to be much of a surprise to Jacob, and you can almost picture a little GW floating above his shoulder and whispering into his ear, “Tell him to bring it on.” Of course, I’m approaching this conversation from the East when it really should be read from left to right. Let me find Richard’s compass.

Okay, after we see Jacob working diligently on weaving a tapestry to decorate the walls of his humble stone hideaway, he heads outside to catch dinner. Next, we see him fillet a fish, cook it, and plop down on the beach to enjoy the meal. He stares off into the horizon as the infamous Black Rock sails a few miles offshore, and Mr. Black walks up and takes a seat next to him. Then, throw in the main ingredient that we all come to expect after 5 seasons of LOST … complete and utter confusion.

Jacob: I take it you’re here because of the ship.
Mr. Black: I am. (pause) How did they find the island?
Jacob: You’ll have to ask them when they get here.
Mr. Black: I don’t have to ask. You brought them here. Still trying to prove me wrong, aren’t you?
Jacob: You are wrong.
Mr. Black: Am I? They come, they fight, they destroy, they corrupt. It always ends the same.
Jacob: It only ends once. Anything that happens before that … is just progress.
Mr. Black: You have any idea how badly I want to kill you?
Jacob: Yes.
Mr. Black: One of these days, sooner or later … I’m going to find a loophole, my friend.
Jacob: Well, when you do, I’ll be right here.

Wow, this snippet of dialogue seems to suggest that these characters are at either end of a philosophical tug of war. One of them apparently has an advantage, and it’s the guy who presides under a larger than life four-toed statue of Taweret, the Egyptian Goddess of birth and rebirth. Meanwhile, I will take a shot in the dark here and say that Mr. Black is a representative of Anubis and Co., the Egyptian God of afterlife and the underworld. As we witnessed when Ben’s daughter accosted him in the temple, hieroglyphics adorning the wall revealed that the smoke monster and Anubis are acquaintances. So, friends, we just might have on our hands a classic battle between black and white, light and dark, life and death or, dare I say, good and evil.

To restate, it only ends once, and anything that happens before that is just progress. Okay, but progress towards what? If you take Mr. Black’s words at face value, the mates aboard the Black Rock are not the first Losties to reach the island, and they will not be the last. Still, let’s start with them. Apparently, they will come, fight, destroy, and corrupt until some sort of end-game scenario. I have a sneaky suspicion that the only person who could likely shed light on this subject, other than our beach bums, is the person whose job seems to be holding his tongue. After seeing Ricardo, or as we know him, Richard, set the sail of the boat in a bottle, it seems safe to assume that he was aboard the Black Rock when it finally landed, literally, on the island.

So, If Richard arrived on the Black Rock, maybe he knows how the statue came to be “destroyed,” and as far fetched as it might seem, maybe a nuclear reactor coupled with a spastic release of electro-magnetic energy just might be what it takes to thrust our Dharma infiltrators through time and space, and back to the day of Richard’s arrival. Maybe, just maybe, the incident thrusts the entire island physically through time, landing just beneath the Black Rock. Inconceivable! But is this Progress?

If you believe Faraday’s theory, humanity’s ability to exercise free will is what makes us unique, and this might just be the constant in life’s awesome equation for humankind. In LOST lure, our survival hinges on a bet between ancient adversaries who represent life and death, a wager that pits humans against themselves to see if they can overcome self destruction by making the right decisions. The island is our casino, and Jacob is the pit boss. As long as he is around to monitor progress, there is no limit to the amount of time the game can carry itself out.

If Jacob and Mr. Black are, in fact, light and dark manifestations of a single entity, call it God, Ra, Apollo, whatever, then they cannot kill each other. Like the yin and yang, they are one and the same. Humans, however, exercise free will, and possess a unique ability to choose between practicing good or evil, knowing right from wrong, turning left or right, going up or down. To be or not to be, kill or be killed, live together, or die alone are all choices we make. These options exist within the proprietary structure of the human brain, and our ability to choose between them makes us unique in the universe.

Jacob is confident that humans are destined for greatness, while Mr. Black ultimately believes doom is their destiny. The latter is no longer interested in entertaining Jacob’s failed experiment, and he decides to take matters into his own hands. He concocts an elaborate plan to take advantage of humankind’s weakness, their infallibility, doubt and insecurity, and use it against Jacob to finally put an end to the charade that exists between them. He constructs and employs the smoke monster to seek out the island’s inhabitants and catalog their memories. It documents their secrets, manipulates their emotions, and manifests itself as their darkest fears right before their eyes.

The smoke monster becomes Mr. Black’s eyes and ears, and John Locke becomes his most vulnerable and receptive target. Upon the arrival of our survivors, Black sets in motion a plan to become the unofficial surrogate father of Claire Littleton’s son, Aaron. Many believe that Claire actually died in the explosion back in Dharmaville. If so, it’s quite possible that Mr. Black and Smokey use Claire as a means to convince John that he must move the island to ensure its safety. Smokey’s manipulative capabilities are limited in scope mostly by its mechanical nature. Still, it obviously has the ability to utilize snippets it carries within it’s memory banks, like a digital camera, and manifest itself in other forms, which might explain Claire’s seemingly uncharacteristic behavior in Horrace’s woodland retreat.

Unfortunately, Mr. Black’s “Plan A” flies out the window the moment little Aaron makes it off the island. Then, to make matters worse, Locke allows Ben to knock the frozen donkey wheel off its axis, which eliminates the boat problem but regretfully sends the island flashing back and forth through time. Still, thanks to clever strategy, Black successfully manages to get Locke placed next in line to lead the island’s people, and then convinces him that bringing back his friends will stop the time shift. Oh yeah, John, and don’t forget that you will have to die to make all this happen because, well, your body is very important to me. Unbeknownst to you and everybody else, it will serve as a great mechanism in my plan to make Ben kill Jacob upon your return to the island. Luckily, he who “lies in the shadow of The Statue” also has an ace up his sleeve, and they share common ancestry. Their names are Christian and Jack Shephard.

If Mr. Black has the ability to infiltrate a human being, there should be no reason that Jacob can’t do the same. He finds his loophole in Christian, who’s body landed on the island the day Flight 815 crashed. Through Shephard, he knows Jack, and understands their relationship, regrets, and unresolved issues. Despite his selfish misguidance and irresponsibility as a father, Christian understood Jack to be a great man, capable of great things. He also introduces Jacob to Claire, who will now do everything in his power to make sure her child does not fall into the hands of Mr. Black. He cannot be raised by another, most notably the prince of darkness.

This is precisely why women cannot bare children on the island. With the forces that are currently at play, it would be too risky as long as Black is scheming to find a loophole. It would appear that Jacob manages to successfully hold Black at bay, safely exiled within the confines of the cabin, encircled in ash and powerless to leave. Hence, his need for Smokey, which becomes a sort of elaborate network of underground security cameras that aid in his search for a candidate. Of course, someone eventually breaks the line of ash, and we all saw good Mr. Locke disappear into the jungle while Ben awaited the arrival of Smokey with Sun and Lapidus. That sneaky devil.

Meanwhile, our friends in 1977 are poised to set off a nuclear bomb that will dissolve the island in poisonous radiation, all part of Jacob’s plan to ensure woman don’t get pregnant. Sun becomes the exception to the rule, which should be a red flag that Jacob’s plan succeeds, only after everything is finally said and, dare I say, done. Our Losties manage to eradicate the Black issue, which we are yet to witness, and in all likelihood, this brings back some of our favorite characters including Michael, Walt, Penny, Desmond, and Charlie. I would love to see Mr. Eko again, but his story has already been told, having stubbornly proven to Mr. Black that human beings are perfectly capable of using free will to determine their own destiny. No thanks, scary smoke monster, I have nothing to confess.

The haunting question that remains is how Jack goes about leading everybody to defeat the seemingly unflappable and cunning black crusader, and our clue lies in a simple fade to white. After all this time, it’s Mr. White’s turn to take the wheel. Jacob “lied,” or schemed, in the shadow of The Statue for a long time, planning the eradication of one Mr. Black. Now, in the show’s final season, we will learn how Hawking and Widmore became cogs in the massive wheel that is Jacob’s plan to get his variables to the island.

Jacob needed Mr. Black to accomplish his task, which explains why Eloise put Locke’s body on the plane. He recruited Illana to warn Richard of Black’s ruse, who will dutifully fulfill his role as adviser once “they” arrive. Jacob’s death becomes the culmination of a faithfully executed plan to set in motion events that, he hoped, would lead Jack and our free-will yielding variables to fight and win a great battle. The outcome of this battle serves as a stepping stone in humankind’s progressive journey towards nirvana. He, who will save us all.

In the end, Jacob clears the board for the next game’s pieces to be set and secures the human soul long enough for the next group of Losties to try their hand at fate within the confines of the great snow globe that is the island. Its original inhabitants, the “Hostiles” or “Others,” are simply those who came before, and the decisions they made permeate the jungle as haunting whispers, like memories of past mistakes that lay deep within the human subconscious. Thus ending a carefully concocted, highly successful, television series nod to the mythological story as described by Joseph Campbell in his book, “The Hero With A Thousand Faces.” Undoubtedly, Cuse and Lindelof will give the book the proverbial product placement that it deserves next season, offering up the same debt of gratitude to Campbell that George Lucas gave when he wrote Star Wars.

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I’m not satisfied with the prevailing idea that Jacob’s Adversary and Smokey are one and the same entity. so I started thinking of how to explain things without the Adversary and Smokey being the same. My line of thought led me to wonder if maybe Smokey and his abilities could be controlled by the power of the mind?
I don’t think that this would be a far fetched idea considering that the Smoke Monster has the ability to scan people’s minds. Couple this with the idea that the Island seems to have a mind of it’s own and that some form of entity that appears to be made of pure thought or pure energy lives in the cabin; I think we’ve got some interesting possibilities about what may be happening on the Island.
Here is what I envision. Jacob’s Adversary exists as pure thought energy, can not exist in corpreal form on its own, and was at one time imprisioned in the cabin by Jacob. Knowing of the abilities that Smokey has, especially the mind scaning ability, the Adversary takes control of the Smoke Monster’s mind and searches the Island for a suitable canidate to inhabit. When a person is found the Adversary uses Smokey to see if the person can be used. If the person can’t be used they are disposedof immediately. If the person can be used, the Adversary directs Smokey to bring the person to the underground tunnels for further investigation. For a person to be of use I believe that they have to be dead first so that the Adversary can than take over their soul and manifest in that person’s visage. However, the Adversary’s control doesn’t last long and not all the souls are easy to take over. Some are may have a stronger will than he has. This is what I think happened when the Adversary tried to have Smokey nab Mr. Eko. Mr. Eko’s mind was to strong and wouldn’t make a good canidate to inhabit. The Adversary needs a person that would be willing to let themselves be utilized and controlled as easy as it is for the Adversary to take control of Smokey. Enter John Locke.
It has been shown on Lost that John is rather easilly conned and has extrordinary faith in the Island. I believe that the Adversary recognized this when Locke first encountered Smokey and then set in motion a plan to take over Locke’s soul and free himself of Jacob.
I’m not sure if this is what is actually happening but I think it is an interesting scenario to ponder. I also don’t think that all the visions on the Island are generated by Smokey and the Adversary, so it makes me wonder which visions we can trust?

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Hello,

I am new to this website, my name is Nick. I registered to get some good converstaions going and meet some lost fans.

One thing iv’e been wondering lately..

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a lot of people have talked about MIB assuming the form of Christian and Locke. People have even mentioned Yemi. What about other appearances? Kate’s black horse? Hurley’s friend from the mental institute? Maybe its possible that smokie/MIB could manifest as these people/animals by scanning dead people’s memories (as I think somebody mentioned somwhere before). Does anybody remember whether the police marshal who was with Kate on the plane was present when her crashed after seeing that black horse? (in one of her flashbacks). If he had seen it too, it would explain how smokie might be able to manifest as the horse (possibly by scanning the dead marshall? i dunno) That still leaves Hurley’s friend unexplained though. Another point to consider is why smokie would manifest as the black horse at all? How does it suddenly appear at the same time Kate remembers it? Maybe this isn’t too important but I was just wonering. Any ideas?

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The idea that the Losties are actually CAUSING the incident which causes them to crash has been thrown around, however I didn’t see any mention of Pierre Chang. I think the fact that in the orientation video he has no hand(or arm?), and that he says that there was “an incident”, would seem to indicate that this incident was THE original incident, as he has his hand crushed. Now of course anything is possible, after all if nothing can really be changed by them being there, then the same incident could have just happened under different circumstances. However if they CAN change what happens, then they cause their own plane to crash. This of course leads to a paradox, how can someone cause themselves to crash in the past, like, how could it have happened the first time? Perhaps, Jacob is the answer to how it got started. But it does seem like there is a timeloop problem going on.

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hi … love this site and all the theories! do you think the oceanic six are in some way related to the numbers? like each person is associated with a number? perhaps they’ve to do something in order of the numbers?

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So idk if this is like common knowledge or something but I think the Jughead is the source of the pregnancy issues on the island. When it was new, it started leaking radioactive material right? So since they barried undergound and it’s been there for a while, maybe the radioactivity spread and that’s why women cannot carry to term and die.

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I wonder what will happen on the 108th episode? If they will have something special planned or a big reveal. If the show runs another 17 episode season (15 + 2 Hour Finale 16/17) and we consider all the 2 Hour Finales to be 2 episodes than the 108th will be the 5th of next season and the season will have 120 in total. I almost wished they cut a few of the filler episodes of the first three seasons and ended on the 108th as the series finale. Any speculations, ideas, wishes for the 108th?

Personally, going with the loop theory, I would bet that we watched desmond’s failed button push and the plane crashes all over again… but then the show obviously doesn’t end with the loop but continues on in the 2007 timeline of the show and resolves life for the losties, Jacob and the MIB, Richard and the Hostiles/Others and the Bram/Ilana Company (and New Dharma?)…

Thoughts?

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Okay this is really long so I put headings on parts if you only want to read certain parts.

Jacob is finally revealed in the finale and he has a nemesis on the island. The final season of the show will undoubtedly expound on the history of the rivalry between the two. The nemesis has not been named. There are tons of questions about the nature of both of them, so here I go.

The Finale
Jacob and his nemesis have a dialogue in which they both seem to know how ‘it ends.’ The nemesis asserts that it always ends the same way, to which Jacob replies that it only ends once. I believe they are talking about the end of humanity. The Valenzetti equation is a Lost phenomenon that is supposed to predict the ‘extinction of the human race.’ I believe Jacob and his nemesis have seen this take place. Some global catastrophe, probably human-caused, brought about the end of the world ‘save the island (which seemingly travels through time faster than the rest of the world, evidenced by what Faraday observed when he sent a clock on a rocket and its time was different than on his watch). Consequently, Jacob turned the donkey wheel to move the island back in time. This action created a time loop. Jacob would thereafter keep bringing people to the island to try to change the outcome of the world. He brings people with the hope that they will redeem their own souls and save humanity by changing the course of events that takes place on the island. His nemesis resents him for this and insists that the plan will never work and the world will end the same way no matter how many times Jacob tries to change it. Jacob and his nemesis were on the island when the rest of the world ended, and were unaffected due to the unique capabilities of the island. This paradox gave them the supernatural abilities that make them who they are now. The range and specific nature of these abilities are not totally clear. However, their powers and ultimately who they are can be slightly illuminated by the Ancient Egyptian deities used to characterize them.

A little light shed on Jacob
When Jacob turned the donkey wheel, he and his nemesis were sent to the times of the Ancient Egyptian Civilization. Jacob journeyed to Africa to bring his new batch of recruits to the island. The Ancient Egyptians were brought to the island, where they witnessed the powers Jacob and his nemesis beheld. Consequently, they believed both of them to be certain gods from their mythology. The creators of Lost proclaim that the 4-toed statue is the goddess Tawaret, but I believe this to be a ruse. Tawaret had the body of a very fat hippopotamus, whereas the statue was slender and masculine wearing a cloth over his pelvic area. Therefore, Jacob was believed to be Sobek, the Egyptian creator god. Sobek is believed to be a repairer of evil, restorer of the dead, and a protector of the living. He is depicted holding an ankh, the symbol for eternal life and one’s ability to undo evil. Similarly, Jacob does not age, has paranormal healing abilities, and seemed to have brought John Locke back to life after he died falling out of a building. He also has the ability to grant other people (Richard) some of his powers. So the Egyptians built a huge 4-toed statue in dedication to him where he could also live.

Who is the Nemesis?
Jacob’s nemesis was believed by the Ancient Egyptians to be Anubis, the Egyptian god of the dead and ruler of the underworld. Anubis’s color was distinctively black to reflect the rotting flesh of the people he brought to the afterlife. For him, the Egyptians built the Temple, an underground chamber with a wall above ground to indicate where it is. Inside the chamber, there is an engraving surrounded by hieroglyphics of Anubis facing what appears to be the smoke monster. The smoke monster is distinctively black just like Anubis. Aside from being called a security system by the others, the smoke monster has judged the living and brought some of them to their death (Eko). Several times that the monster has appeared in the forest, the front of it has split into three ‘heads.’ On the blast door map that Locke was able to see in the Hatch during the Dharma food drop (when his leg got impaled by the door), the monster is described as the Cerberus system. Cerberus, in Greek mythology, was a three-headed dog who was the ruler of Hades, the underworld. The converging evidence from the season 5 finale and the reset of Lost leads me to believe that the Nemesis can reconstitute himself as the smoke monster. The large body of black smoke is all the ‘rotting flesh of the people he brought to the afterlife.’ The Nemesis can make people sick and disabled, like when he began slowly paralyzing Locke when he couldn’t find the hatch in season one. He can also take the form of the dead bodies on the island. This is evidenced by his appearance as Yemi, Christian, and Locke.

The question remains: what are they doing here?
They are on the island in the ultimate battle to save or not to save humanity. The Lost producers are huge fans of zooming in on people’s faces when what they are saying is important. In the first episode the show ever had, Locke was telling Walt about backgammon. All the things he said were a direct reference to the battle between Jacob and his nemesis. Locke called it the ‘oldest game in the world’ and said there were ‘2 players, 2 sides, one is light, one is dark.’ He also said that ‘their dice were made of bones.’ Someone else wrote a theory saying that line hinted at the use by Jacob and his nemesis of people in their battle, a good point. When he calls it the oldest game in the world, it is a reference to the fact that Jacob and his nemesis have been in this battle for almost as long as humans existed on earth. When talking about the thread he was weaving, Jacob says it ‘takes a very long time’but I suppose that’s the point isn’t it?’ Also, I think it is important to note that Locke didn’t call the 2 sides good and evil, because that isn’t the distinction the writers of the show try to make between the two characters. Jacob represents the light, evidenced by his always wearing white and his association with life and creation. He is, however, not devoid of evil, since he is the one who had Nadia killed by that car and had people on the island killed in his name. His nemesis represents the dark, evidenced by the black smoke and the bodies he possesses wearing primarily black. He is, however, not an evil force on the island. He wants to kill Jacob for his attempts to change the course of history; he does not want to destroy humanity himself. In fact, he wants to end the time loop because every time it ends the same, with destruction and corruption. The only way he can end the time loop is by eliminating the cause of it. He must kill Jacob. There are, however, rules.

The Rules & Loophole
Jacob and his nemesis are engaged in a ‘backgammon’ match of whether or not humanity can save itself. Jacob thinks it can, and brings flawed people to the island to redeem themselves and the rest of the world. His nemesis wishes it could, but experience has proved it never will and he just wants the cycle of destruction to end. But whatever happens, it will be the actions of humans, not the two of them, which determines the end. As a logical consequence, none of the events that will alter the future and potentially change the outcome can be carried out by either Jacob or his nemesis. Thus, the two cannot kill each other, though it doesn’t appear Jacob wishes to kill his nemesis anyway. But Jacob’s nemesis can get someone on the island to, through his own free will, kill Jacob. There appear to be more rules, however, and Jacob’s nemesis has been trying to find a loophole in them for at least a century, possibly for thousands of years. When Locke wanted to bring Ben in with him to see Jacob, Richard objected, saying, ‘Only our leader can request an audience with Jacob and there can only be one leader at a time on the island.’ We know that Ben only became leader once Widmore left, and Locke only became leader once Ben left. I believe Jacob told Richard that those were rules to be followed on the island so as not to allow his nemesis to exploit the apparent loophole in the rules between the two. I believe the rules between Jacob and his nemesis are as follows, and they are mostly speculation from minimal evidence from the show:
1) Neither one can kill the other.
2) Only the leader of Jacob’s people can kill Jacob.
3) Jacob’s people have to follow the nemesis as their leader.

Evidence
The rules appear at first glance totally to prevent the nemesis from ever being able to kill Jacob. But Jacob and his adversary know there is a loophole. The loophole is that the nemesis has to get Jacob’s people to think he is their leader when he really isn’t. Ben was the leader of the others during the finale, since Locke was actually dead still. Richard and the rest of them believed, however, that Locke (actually the nemesis) was their leader. If these are the actual rules, then that is the apparent loophole and how the nemesis was finally able to kill Jacob.
The evidence from the show tends to support my theory that those were the rules, albeit it not very substantially. The nemesis would use Locke to get Ben to want to kill Jacob, and then would have Locke leave the island, and come back from dead upon his return to claim his stake as leader. Meanwhile, Ben would still be the actually leader and the nemesis would convince him, through Locke, to kill Jacob. I believe that the first time Locke encountered the smoke monster, in season one, it was then that the nemesis decided Locke would be the pawn he would use to kill Jacob. I’m not sure how the monster appeared to Locke, but he called it ‘the eye of this island’beautiful.’ So the nemesis now had someone who had unwavering faith and attachment to the island. Before that, he had to make the leader unhappy with Jacob. So he gave Ben cancer, something Jacob would not do and could prevent (Jacob brought Jack to the island in part to heal Ben). Furthermore, the nemesis knew that Ben, who was insecure and always searching acceptance from his dad who thought he killed his mom, would be personally offended and hurt by the fact that he never actually saw or spoke to Jacob. So he used Locke for seasons 2 through 4 to make him look more and more like the next leader and, at the same time, anger and put down Ben enough to make him resent Locke and be upset with Jacob. When the two went to Jacob’s cabin, where the nemesis had been for quite some time now, the nemesis exclaimed ‘help me’ to Locke to make Ben jealous and even more resentful of the fact he had never spoken to Jacob and now Locke has. The hardest part, though, was making Locke look like the next leader. He did much to convince Locke, like paralyzing him a little until he found the hatch and testing his faith in the island with the button-pressing. So, when the donkey wheel started skipping through time, Locke told Richard to come to him as a child and ask him a series of questions to see if he could be the leader. Then, he posed as Locke and told Richard to tell the real Locke, who he amazingly knew would be there at that exact time, that he had to die to save his friends. These, combined with Locke killing his dad on the island (which ne never actually did, Sawyer did) and other things thoroughly convinced Richard that Locke should be their next leader. Because, if you remember, Richard initially never believed Locke had what it took. He failed the test as a kid and Richard was always doubtful that Locke was truly special. Then, to get Locke off the island, he posed as Christian, whose dead body was also on the island, in the cabin. He told Ben that Locke had to move the island, which takes the actor to the Tunisian desert. Christian also told him that he would have to sacrifice himself, after Locke heard the same from Richard in the time flashes. Ben threw a kink in the plans when he actually moved the island himself, but his dedication to the island would bring him back to it anyway. So, when Ben killed Locke off the island and the two returned, Locke was dead for good (I know it sucks). But this was what the nemesis had been planning since Locke got to the island. Ben was the leader once again, but the body of evidence and events led everyone to believe that a reborn Locke was the unquestioned leader. Then, in the Temple, the nemesis appeared to Ben as Alex and told him to do exactly as Locke (the nemesis himself) says. Thus, he was assured Ben would kill Jacob. After that, all the pieces were in place and the loophole was exploited. Jacob was killed by his nemesis.

Looking Forward
Season 6 will undoubtedly explain the rules and the loophole and, hopefully, it will resemble at least a little bit what I wrote here. I believe Jacob knew all that was happening, knew he was going to be killed, and was not afraid of it. After all, he put Sayid and Hurley on the plane the second time so that Locke and Ben could successfully get back to the island. Furthermore, he summed Ilana, who is somehow very familiar with him, to get her people and go back to the island. He was talking about her and the rest of his Latin-speaking friends when he said ‘They’re coming’ right before he got kicked into the fire. So Jacob being alive or not is not the most important thing to him I guess. I’m sorry this theory was really, really long. It probably leaves a lot of important evidence out and takes small observations from other people’s theories. But, without going through and watching all 5 seasons again, I hope it is good and well thought out.

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Hey all still love the site!

Right just a few bits and bobs to discuss and get feedback on

Firstly a lot of theories about light vs dark and good vs evil. I am thinking there is definatly some kind of war going on but i dont think there is a side that is right or wrong. Remember man of science vs

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I’ve been formulating some more theories based on the concept that the Jacob and Mib are God and the Devil, and the Island is Eden. Here they are, please feel free to discredit, support, discuss!

Basic Premise:
The Island = Eden
Jacob = God
Mib = Devil
Jacob and Mib debate about whether fallible humans, left to their own devices and free will, will choose a righteous path or a self serving path.

So, The Others may be the Redeemed Ones. Those that have passed the test and have been allowed to live on the island eternally (they have been allowed back into Eden, even though humans were cast out long ago).

The Losties are the proverbial guinea pigs… brought to the island simply for the purpose of settling the bet between Jacob and Mib, by installing them into a predetermined set of circumstances to see how they deal with it all (righteous path or a self serving path). Jacob, repeatedly disappointed but refusing to lose hope in humanity, loops them back through time again and again to allow the humans to “progress” in their spiritual development, because he believes that they will eventually redeem themselves. Jacob essentially “forgives them for they know not what they do.”

The Dharma Initiative, I believe is the result of human beings stumbling across the island and attempting to colonize it so they can harness the power of the island. They have to install a fence around their colony to protect them from the true power and purpose of the island… which is to test and judge.

I’d love to hear someone apply some of this to theories about Aaron and his ultimate purpose. In earlier seasons, children seemed to be a really big deal to the Dharma Initiative, remember they quickly kidnapped all the children as soon as Flight 815 crashed, and explained later that they were “giving them a better life”??

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I was doing a little research and found this interesting. I was googling Faraday when Micheal Faraday came up. Here’s the first paragraph from Wikipedia;

Michael Faraday, FRS (22 September 1791 ‘ 25 August 1867) was an English chemist and physicist (or natural philosopher, in the terminology of the time) who contributed to the fields of electromagnetism and electrochemistry.

Faraday studied the magnetic field around a conductor carrying a DC electric current, and established the basis for the electromagnetic field concept in physics. He discovered electromagnetic induction, diamagnetism, and laws of electrolysis. He established that magnetism could affect rays of light and that there was an underlying relationship between the two phenomena.1]/sup>
[2]
His inventions of electromagnetic rotary devices formed the foundation of electric motor technology, and it was largely due to his efforts that electricity became viable for use in technology.

Anyone think this has any significance?

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Maybe this has been asked and answered before and I just did not see it.

Soooo…….Eloise HAWKING is Daniel’s mother and Charles WIDMORE is his father. Did I miss in the show where they explained why Daniel’s last name is FARADAY? Just an thought I had today that never really hit me before. I could see if Eloise and Charles were not married her not giving him the Widmore name, but if that were the case why did she just not make his last name Hawking?

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