SHARE:

Humans Good or Evil?

This is my theory about who Jacob and his nemesis are. I have come to this conclusion after watching the finale for the third time. Jacob and his nemesis who i’ve dubbed the anti-Jacob are both gods, most likely a type of egyptian god coming from a pantheon of other gods like them. They are special because they have been chosen to judge the nature of the ultimate earthly creations, humans. Are they good or evil? The island was created as a kind of place, separate from the rest of humanity, where certain people could be judged without other variables. The reason that Jacob and anti-Jacob are enemies is because they both have differing views on whether humans are evil or good. Jacob believes that humans are good by nature and that when faced with tough situations, ultimately they will make the right decision. Jacob brings groups of people to the island and unleashes them there. He thinks that all of humankind on earth should be told about the true nature of the universe, about creation, and about the existence of the gods. He believes that when faced with these things people will be accepting that there are beings with higher power than them in the universe and will continue to live their lives without trying to take that power for themselves. The anti-Jacob believes that humans are evil by nature and will do anything to further themselves. He knows that even when humans don’t always make bad decisions, they at least consider making bad decisions in their mind. That is why he manifests himself as the smoke monster, so that he can look deep into the souls of humans and determine their thoughts. Perhaps the smoke monster doesn’t kill bad people and leave good people, but the opposite. When he finds a person who is ultimately good, like Ecko, he kills them because he doesn’t want Jacob to discover them. In the same way the anti-Jacob also manifests himself as a person from different humans lives to either put them in dangerous situations where they might die or to put them in situations that push them down the path to being evil. The anti-Jacob thinks that he can make humans do things that they normally wouldn’t do on their own. He thinks he can make them try to take the power of the gods for themselves. He knows that the ultimate way he can prove that humans are evil is if he can persuade one to do something very bad, like attempting to kill Jacob. In order to do this, anti-Jacob (already as Locke) makes sure that Richard tells Locke that he needs to bring everyone back to the island and that he is going to need to die. When the plane brings Locke’s body back to the island, anti-Jacob manifests himself as Locke in the same way he manifests himself as Christian Shepherd. As Locke, anti-Jacob is in a perfect position to make Ben do whatever he says. Anti-Jacob also convinces Ben further by manifesting himself as Ben’s daughter. When Ben is completely under anti-Jacobs control he convinces him to kill Jacob. Since Jacob is immortal I think he survives being stabbed and burned by Ben and anti-Jacob. After Jacob survives he will come to the realization that the humans who he believed were good, who he protected, are ultimately evil by nature.

Share with fellow Losties

Written by

Alpha_and_Omega

3 thoughts on “Humans Good or Evil?

  1. John Locke, the political theorist, and others like him (Thomas Hobbes, etc.) explain humanity in the absence of Society. They call this the State of Nature and explain their views on humanity when there are no rules governing our actions. Locke says all men are rational, but will do what they can to improve their own life. He says in different parts of his theory that humans are inherently good, and then inherently evil. I think he’s a bit inconsistent.
    Thomas Hobbes, by contrast, says humans will ALWAYS act in their self-interest. They will kill another when it is helpful to do so, and will try to win the favor of a stronger man in hopes the stronger man won’t kill him.
    I like how you say this is a place free from outside variables. Reminds me of studying political theory.
    Any thoughts on this?

Leave a Reply